Blog

Blog
Blog2018-12-31T09:28:59+00:00

Around the web – Highlights Week 42

A list of the articles I read this week (42) and the highlights I made for them. (Last week)   Develop Your Emotional Intelligence by Watching Great Television Dramas After it was all said and done, the drama-watching group’s empathy scores were substantially higher than the nonfiction-watching group. Black and Barnes speculate that watching fictional people experience hardship causes you to consider their problems from multiple perspectives; including what it would be like to be in the character’s shoes. Empathy and emotional intelligence are what many consider to be the basis for “being a good person,” so you might as well use it [...]

By |October 18th, 2015|Categories: Allgemein, Lifehacker, Technology|0 Comments

Around the web – Highlights Week 41

A list of the articles I read this week (41) and the highlights I made for them. (Last week)   Toxic Habits: Overthinking Rumination is thinking (and thinking and thinking) about something upsetting, but in a passive way, without actually taking action. Rumination makes people think they are working on a problem, but not only does rumination not produce solutions, it also exacerbates the problem. All that thinking takes up time and energy individuals could spend fixing the problem. In fact, those who ruminate develop major depression at four times the rate of those who don’t ruminate. It’s like a hamster running frantically on a wheel, [...]

By |October 11th, 2015|Categories: Allgemein, Lifehacker, Technology|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

Around the web – Highlights Week 40

A list of the articles I read this week (40) and the highlights I made for them. (Last week) VP9 encoding/decoding performance vs. HEVC/H.264 For example, the red point at 1960kbps has an SSIM score of 18.16. The blue line has two points at 17.52 (1950) and 18.63 (3900kbps). Interpolation gives an estimated point for SSIM=18.16 around 2920kbps, which is 49% larger. So, to accomplish the same SSIM score (quality), x264 needs 49% more bitrate than libvpx. Ergo, libvpx is 49% better than x264 at this bitrate, this is called the bitrate improvement (%). x265 gets approximately the same improvement over [...]

By |October 4th, 2015|Categories: Allgemein, Lifehacker, Technology|Tags: , , , , , , |0 Comments

Around the web – Highlights Week 39

A list of the articles I read this week (39) and the highlights I made for them.   Do You Really Need a Good Night’s Sleep to Exercise Well? So when we’re talking about aerobic exercise like running or cycling, there’s anywhere from a small-to-zero difference in your performance. Aerobic (like distance running) and anaerobic (like sprinting) sports: the difference after poor sleep is “marginal.” You might not even notice. Repeated anaerobic efforts, like weightlifting: Increased fatigue. Sports requiring strategy and concentration: You’re worse at making decisions. “High vigilance” sports, including anything where you have to aim at a target: You’ll [...]

By |September 27th, 2015|Categories: Allgemein, Lifehacker|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Human-Centered Design: an Introduction

[toc] My notes for Human-Centered Design: an Introduction, without any warranty. If you find any errors or, more importantly, the answer to the final exam question (the one marked with '???'), please don't hesitate to contact me! About the course: In this course, you will learn how to design technologies that bring people joy, rather than frustration. You'll learn several techniques for rapidly prototyping and evaluating multiple interface alternatives -- and why rapid prototyping and comparative evaluation are essential to excellent interaction design. You'll learn how to conduct fieldwork with people to help you get design ideas. How to make paper [...]

By |September 20th, 2015|Categories: Technology|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Revisiting the hype of the 80ies – Deep Networks – 1

With the current (re-)hype of neural nets and everything that is AI I tried to revisit the good old lectures and give that old AI knowledge of the past a new spin. The experiment: teach a neural network to train the sound of my door bell and program a small computer to inform me if it recognizes that sound. This hold several implications: The amount of computational power the neural net can perform (e. g. the size and complexity) is limited and possibilities to go nuts are also out of the question (like, use a GPU to calculate stuff). Nonetheless I [...]

By |August 25th, 2015|Categories: Technology|Tags: , , , |0 Comments